WestSouthwest

Interviews with news makers and discussion of topics important to Southwest Michigan. Heard Monday and Thursday mornings at 9:30. With an afternoon rebroadcast both days at 3:30

File photo of the South Haven lighthouse
WMUK

Gary Wilson says if the Trump administration’s proposed cuts stand it would be devastating for Great Lakes restoration. The contributor to Detroit Public Television’s Great Lakes Bureau says it would be like a panic stop with your car. “You’re going forward and then suddenly put a halt to everything.”


Melissa Benmark / WKAR

The Michigan Campaign Finance Network calls 2016 the year of the lobbyist. But the group’s director Craig Mauager says 2017 could top it.


Kalamazoo Public Library

On WestSouthwest, basketball legend and author Kareem Abdul-Jabbar discusses race, religion, gender equality and more. A Kalamazoo College student's play honors the life of a radio pioneer. 


Earlene McMichael | WMUK

When it was time for Kalamazoo College senior Kaylah "Kami" Simmons to choose a capstone project to do this year, she thought of a famous man she met in high school -- Hal Jackson. He's an African-American who broke the color barrier in radio in the '30s and is in several Halls of Fame. She didn't know his significance back then. Now a theater arts major with a media studies concentration who's contemplating a journalism career, Simmons wants more people to know about Jackson and this Saturday presents a reader's theater play inspired by his life. He died in 2012 at 96.


Andrew Harnik, The Associated Press / AP

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is still known to many people as a star basketball player, with UCLA in college and later the Los Angeles Lakers in the NBA. But Abdul-Jabbar says he’s also a concerned American, “and I felt I should speak out on something that I know is a serious issue for my country.”


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